Teaching Friendship Skills Through Social Stories


social stories learning how to be a good friend

What is a Social Story?

A social story is an individualized short story that describes a social situation and reinforces a desired skill, task, or behavior. Social stories use succinct sentences that are usually accompanied by a simple photograph or illustration. They are easily memorized and intended to be read aloud over and over again. When I was in graduate school to become a School Counselor,  I was trained to use and write social stories for children with autism or learning disabilities, but I have found them to be useful for all children.

My youngest, Owen, is at that age where he is beginning to learn what it really means to be a friend. In honor of Valentine’s Day, a terrific time to teach your child about love and friendship, I put together a social story for him titled, Be a Friend. To make the book, I used a $2.00 photo album from Target, scrapbook stickers, and photographs of Owen.

Writing a Social Story.

Social stories are positive and typically follow a specified format: introduction, skill instruction, and a positive “I Can/Am” message. Below is the social story that I wrote for Owen to teach and reinforce friendship skills.

Be A Friend

kid friendship
A friend is someone that you enjoy spending time with. A friend can be a boy or a girl. A friend can be someone older or younger.

Teaching kids how to be good friends

Sometimes it can be hard to make a new friend. They might not know that I want to be their friend. By smiling and saying, “hello,” I can show that I am friendly.

Friends play together.

teaching kids how to work together with friends

Friends care.

friendship, teaching kids how to be friends

Friends can do a lot together. Friends can share silly moments!

friendship for kids

To have a friend, you must be a friend. I am kind, caring, and gentle. I am a friend!

Using a Social Story.

If read frequently, social stories are a valuable learning tool. In some cases, they may be starting blocks for further discussion. However, keep in mind the age of the child that you are reading to. Most times, social stories are simply another way of saying, “This is just how we do it,” and there is no need for discussion.

Social stories can be used when you want to introduce something new (like going on an airplane ride). They may be read throughout the day to reinforce a skill (like potty training). Another useful time to read a social story is when your child is calm after experiencing a strong emotion (like a tantrum).

I like to store social stories on a basket on the floor. Completely accessible, Colin and Owen can help themselves and read the pictures on their own.

Have you ever used social stories in your home? How did your child respond to them?

 

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future posts delivered to your feed reader.
About Melissa

Melissa Lennig blogs at Fireflies and Mud Pies, a children’s activity blog that inspires childhood through imagination, art, and nature. Connect with Melissa through Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] For your reading pleasure today, please visit me over at Inner Child Learning. [...]

  2. [...] Teaching Friendship Skills Through Social Stories {Inner Child Learning} [...]

  3. [...] stores with their children too For detailed instructions and a fun example, check out the article Teaching Friendship Skills Through Social Stories from Inner Child [...]

  4. [...] nice little piece from Inner Child Learning about using a tool called “social stories” to support children in developing friendship skills. Really, you can use the principles here to help children develop whatever qualities or ideas [...]

  5. [...] Teaching Friendship Skills Through Social Stories — Our contributing writer, Melissa, shares a fantastic idea to teach kids about friendship by [...]